Who Are Flowers Trying To Seduce?

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Since most plants are rooted in place, theycan’t reproduce by attracting other members of their species.

Instead, they rely on outsideforces to transport their tiny pollen grains from male flower parts to female ones.

Oneof nature’s weirdest flowers, the stinking corpse lily, mimics rotting meat to lure carrionflies from one plant to another.

The vibrant yellows and blues of certain flowersmatch up with the parts of the color spectrum where a bee’s vision is most sensitive.

Because bees are stellar smellers, these flowers also spritz out a tempting perfume to drawthem in.

And many bee-pollinated plants offer convenient, ultraviolet-marked landing padswhere the pudgy pollinators can rest while snagging nectar and pollen.

The vibrant yellows and blues of certain flowers match up with the parts of the color spectrumwhere a bee’s vision is most sensitive.

And many bee-pollinated plants offer convenient,ultraviolet-marked landing pads where the pudgy pollinators can rest while snaggingnectar and pollen.

Because bees are stellar smellers, these flowers also spritz out atempting perfume to draw them in.

Hummingbirds, on the other hand, have a lousysense of smell but an excellent memory for food sources, so flowers that cater to themkeep them coming back by churning out a steady supply of sweet nectar, which they stash indeep tubes to ensure a pollen swap with each visit.

These flowers’ hues keep their nectarsafe from red-blind bees, who might otherwise snag the sugary reward without picking uppollen.

Other flowers bloom at night, bearing bright-whitepetals and potent smells that draw moths and bats in the dark.

Still others grow closeto the ground and give off a yeasty scent to lure in rodent pollinators.

And some plants forgo animals entirely, instead making it easy for wind or water to spreadtheir pollen far and wide.

Of course, many plants have multiple pollinators,and most pollinators tend to more than one kind of plant.

But almost every plant is continuouslyevolving to maximize its pollination potential, and as a result, their flowers hint at who- or what – moves most of their pollen.

Because for plants, the birds and the bees reallyis all about the birds and the bees.

and the carrion flies.

Hey, this is Kate from MinuteEarth.

Now that you’ve watched this video, consider takinga second to snap some photos of flowers – whether they’re outside or in a vase – and let usknow who, or what, you think pollinates them.

You can post your guesses on social mediausing the hashtag #FlowerSeduction – we'd love to see what you can find! Also, did youknow that we’ve started adding more information to our video descriptions? There, you’llfind related links we love and definitions of terms like hydrophily, nectar guides, andothers that will help your knowledge blossom.

And, as always, thanks to our supporters onPatreon who made this video possible.

Source: Youtube